Standards, Limits and Conditions for Prescribing, Ordering and Administering Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Issued: September 28, 2015

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The following are the standards for midwives to independently prescribe, order, and administer drugs in the community, hospital or other sites of midwifery practice to treat sexually transmitted infections for clients in care, as designated under specialized practice certification. Midwives without specialized practice certification in sexually transmitted infections management are required to refer their clients to an appropriate health care practitioner for treatment.

Standards, Limits and Conditions for Prescribing, Ordering and Administering Drugs for Sexually Transmitted Infections in Midwifery Practice

The standards below provide midwifery indications, routes of administration and upper dosage limits where appropriate, adverse effects and contraindications for the use of drugs to treat sexually transmitted infections approved for use in midwifery practice for midwives with specialized practice certification. Midwives may only prescribe, order or administer the following drugs within the standards set out in this document and to a client under their professional care where the drug is required for the purposes outlined below. This list is inclusive. Midwives may not independently prescribe, order, or administer any other controlled drugs unless, on the advice of the College’s Multidisciplinary Standards of Practice Committee, these standards are amended to be consistent with the Schedule A and B of the Midwives Regulation or the government amends the Schedules to the Midwives Regulation.

Midwives who are certified in treating sexually transmitted infections can diagnose and treat the following infections:

Bacterial Vaginosis

Chlamydia Trachomatis

Neisseria Gonorrhea

Trichomoniasis

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References

[BROKEN LINK] BC Centre for Disease Control, 2015, British Columbia Treatment Guidelines: Sexually Transmitted Infections in Adolescents and Adults 2014. [online]. 2015. [Accessed 22 September 2015]. Available from: http://www.bccdc.ca/NR/rdonlyres/46AC4AC5-96CA-4063- A563-0BA9F4A0A6E9/0/CPS_BC_STI_Treatment_Guidelines_27082014.pdf

Briggs, G G and Freeman, R K, 2012, A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk: Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 10. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health.

crnbc.ca, 2015, Sexually Transmitted Infections Management. [online]. 2015. [Accessed 22 September 2015]. Available from: https://www.crnbc.ca/Standards/CertifiedPractice/STI/Pages/Default.aspx

Hale, Thomas Wright and Rowe, Hilary E, 2014, Medications & Mothers’ Milk. 16. Hale Publishing, LP.